Renewing lighting in a housing company

The renewal of indoor and outdoor lighting generates cost savings and increases comfort in residential properties. Lighting of increasingly better quality can be achieved with lower operating costs than before.

Lower operating costs

Increasing the efficiency of energy use can serve as grounds even for the renewal of fairly functional lighting. The operating costs of lighting can be reduced by choosing more energy efficient bulbs and light fixtures, and by directing lighting where it is needed.

The poor quality or condition of lighting – such as blinking, too little light or an uncomfortable colour in the light – may create a need to renew the lighting. At latest, the need to renew lighting will be encountered towards the end of the lights’ service life or when renovating buildings or yards.

Bulb types that are not energy efficient, such as mercury bulbs used in outdoor lighting, are no longer on the market, which may lead to a need to renew lighting faster than expected. It may not be necessary to renew well-functioning lights entirely because the markets do provide halide lamps that replace mercury lamps and can be installed in an old light fixture without changes or alterations.

A housing company’s check list for good lighting:
  1. Review the lamp types used in outdoor and indoor lighting and check the possibility to switch to more energy efficient alternatives in connection with the changing of lamps.
  2. Find out the lighting’s control mechanism and ensure that lighting is not on unnecessarily.
  3. Review the options for modernising the lighting with a lighting expert; both lights and their adjustment and control possibilities.
  4. Consider the effects that other possible renovation needs, such as the painting of staircases and any possible building work in the yard, may have on the scheduling of the lighting renewal.
  5. Find out the kinds of alternative solutions there are on the market.
  6. Decide which aspects to emphasise when you open the project for competition, and compare the overall costs of different solutions.


Was this article useful?

Page last updated 15.6.2017